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Hunter Lee
Hunter Lee

How Good Reasons with Contemporary Arguments Can Help You Write Better Essays and Persuade Your Audience


Here is the outline of the article: # Good Reasons with Contemporary Arguments: A Review ## Introduction - What is the book about? - Who are the authors and what are their credentials? - What is the main purpose and audience of the book? - What are some of the key features and benefits of the book? ## Part 1: Reading and Discovering Arguments - How does the book define an argument and why is it important to make effective arguments? - How does the book help readers find arguments in everyday conversations and distinguish them from other kinds of persuasion? - How does the book teach readers to explore controversies and read critically? - How does the book guide readers to analyze arguments using Toulmin's model and rhetorical appeals? ## Part 2: Writing Arguments - How does the book help readers find a topic and develop a research question? - How does the book instruct readers to conduct research and evaluate sources? - How does the book explain how to organize and draft an argumentative essay? - How does the book provide tips on how to revise and edit an argumentative essay? ## Part 3: Style and Design in Arguments - How does the book teach readers to use style and tone effectively in arguments? - How does the book show readers how to use visual elements and multimedia in arguments? - How does the book demonstrate how to document sources and avoid plagiarism? ## Part 4: Readings on Contemporary Issues - What are some of the topics and themes covered in the readings section of the book? - How do the readings represent different perspectives and genres of argumentation? - How do the readings illustrate the concepts and skills taught in the previous parts of the book? ## Conclusion - What are some of the main strengths and weaknesses of the book? - How does the book compare to other similar books on argumentation? - Who would benefit from reading this book and why? ## FAQs - Q: Where can I buy this book? - Q: How can I access additional resources for this book? - Q: What are some other books that complement this book? - Q: How can I apply what I learned from this book to my own writing projects? - Q: How can I give feedback to the authors of this book? Here is the article based on that outline: # Good Reasons with Contemporary Arguments: A Review Have you ever wondered how to create an effective argument? Whether you need to write an essay for a class, a letter to a politician, or a blog post for your website, you need to know how to persuade your audience with good reasons. That's where Good Reasons with Contemporary Arguments comes in. This is a practical, visually engaging introduction to argument supported by provocative readings on contemporary issues. In this review, I will tell you what this book is about, who wrote it, what it can teach you, and why you should read it. ## Introduction Good Reasons with Contemporary Arguments is a college textbook that teaches you how to make arguments in various contexts and genres. The authors are Lester Faigley, Jack Selzer, Jessica Enoch, and Scott Wible. They are all professors of rhetoric and writing at different universities in the United States. They have extensive experience in teaching and researching argumentation. The main purpose of this book is to help you find "good reasons" to argue for the positions you take. The authors define a good reason as "a claim that is supported by evidence that your readers will accept as true or valid" (p. 3). The authors also explain that good reasons depend on your audience, your purpose, your genre, your tone, your style, and your design. The audience of this book is mainly college students who need to write argumentative essays, but it can also be useful for anyone who wants to improve their argumentation skills. Some of the key features and benefits of this book are: - It uses lively, nontechnical language, an attractive visual design, numerous examples, and fresh, timely readings to engage your interest. - It avoids complicated schemes and terminology in favor of providing you with the practical ways of finding good reasons to argue. - It covers the whole process of argumentation, from finding a topic, to conducting research, to drafting, revising, and editing your essay. - It teaches you how to analyze arguments using Toulmin's model and rhetorical appeals (ethos, pathos, logos). - It shows you how to use style and tone effectively in arguments, as well as how to use visual elements and multimedia to enhance your arguments. - It provides you with a rich selection of readings on contemporary issues, such as immigration, social media, climate change, and gender equality. The readings represent different perspectives and genres of argumentation, such as academic essays, speeches, letters, blogs, cartoons, and videos. - It includes helpful exercises, activities, questions, checklists, and tips throughout the book to help you practice and apply what you learn. ## Part 1: Reading and Discovering Arguments The first part of the book is about reading and discovering arguments. In this part, you will learn: - What exactly is an argument and why is it important to make effective arguments in college and beyond. The authors explain that an argument is "a claim or a set of claims that you support with good reasons" (p. 3). They also explain that arguments are essential for academic success, civic engagement, personal growth, and social change. - How to find arguments in everyday conversations and distinguish them from other kinds of persuasion. The authors show you how to identify the claims, reasons, evidence, warrants, backing, qualifiers, and rebuttals in an argument. They also show you how to recognize fallacies, biases, stereotypes, and propaganda in persuasive messages. - How to explore controversies and read critically. The authors teach you how to find controversies by asking questions, doing preliminary research, browsing the internet, and reading newspapers and magazines. They also teach you how to read critically by asking questions before, during, and after reading an argument. They provide you with a list of questions to help you evaluate the credibility, relevance, accuracy, sufficiency, and consistency of an argument. - How to analyze arguments using Toulmin's model and rhetorical appeals. The authors introduce you to Toulmin's model of argumentation, which consists of six elements: claim (the main point), reason (the support), evidence (the proof), warrant (the connection), backing (the justification), qualifier (the limitation), and rebuttal (the counterargument). They also introduce you to the three rhetorical appeals: ethos (the credibility), pathos (the emotion), and logos (the logic). They show you how to use these tools to analyze the strengths and weaknesses of an argument. ## Part 2: Writing Arguments The second part of the book is about writing arguments. In this part, you will learn: - How to find a topic and develop a research question. The authors teach you how to narrow down your topic by considering your purpose, audience, genre, and context. They also teach you how to develop a research question that guides your inquiry and helps you focus your argument. - How to conduct research and evaluate sources. The authors teach you how to use various sources of information, such as books, articles, websites, databases, and interviews. They also teach you how to evaluate sources based on their authority, currency, relevance, accuracy, and purpose. They provide you with a checklist to help you assess the quality of your sources. - How to organize and draft an argumentative essay. The authors teach you how to structure your essay using the classical model of introduction, thesis statement, body paragraphs, and conclusion. They also teach you how to draft your essay using the following steps: brainstorming, outlining, writing, and revising. They provide you with examples of outlines and drafts for different types of arguments. - How to revise and edit an argumentative essay. The authors teach you how to revise your essay by focusing on the global issues of content, organization, and coherence. They also teach you how to edit your essay by focusing on the local issues of grammar, punctuation, spelling, and style. They provide you with checklists and tips to help you improve your essay. ## Part 3: Style and Design in Arguments The third part of the book is about style and design in arguments. In this part, you will learn: - How to use style and tone effectively in arguments. The authors teach you how to use style and tone to suit your purpose, audience, genre, p. 217) and tone is "the attitude you convey toward your subject and your audience" (p. 217). They show you how to use different stylistic devices, such as diction, sentence structure, figurative language, and humor. They also show you how to use different tones, such as formal, informal, serious, playful, respectful, and sarcastic. - How to use visual elements and multimedia in arguments. The authors teach you how to use visual elements and multimedia to enhance your arguments and appeal to your audience. They explain that visual elements are "any images or graphics that accompany a written or spoken argument" (p. 245) and multimedia are "any combination of text, images, sound, video, or animation in an argument" (p. 245). They show you how to use different types of visual elements and multimedia, such as charts, graphs, tables, maps, photographs, cartoons, videos, podcasts, and websites. They also show you how to design your visual elements and multimedia using the principles of contrast, repetition, alignment, and proximity. - How to document sources and avoid plagiarism. The authors teach you how to document sources and avoid plagiarism in your arguments. They explain that documenting sources is "the process of providing information about the sources you use in your argument" (p. 273) and plagiarism is "the act of using someone else's words or ideas without giving proper credit" (p. 273). They show you how to document sources using two common styles: MLA (Modern Language Association) and APA (American Psychological Association). They also show you how to avoid plagiarism by quoting, paraphrasing, summarizing, and citing your sources correctly. ## Part 4: Readings on Contemporary Issues The fourth part of the book is a collection of readings on contemporary issues. In this part, you will find: - A variety of topics and themes that are relevant and interesting for today's readers. The topics and themes include immigration, social media, climate change, gender equality, education, health care, sports, and culture. The authors have selected readings that reflect diverse perspectives and experiences on these issues. - A variety of perspectives and genres of argumentation that represent different modes and purposes of writing. The perspectives include academic, professional, personal, and public. The genres include essays, speeches, letters, blogs, cartoons, and videos. The authors have selected readings that demonstrate different modes and purposes of writing, such as analysis, evaluation, proposal, narrative, and satire. - A variety of illustrations of the concepts and skills taught in the previous parts of the book. The readings illustrate how to make effective arguments using good reasons, Toulmin's model, rhetorical appeals, style, tone, visual elements, and multimedia. The readings also illustrate how to document sources and avoid plagiarism using MLA or APA style. ## Conclusion Good Reasons with Contemporary Arguments is a comprehensive and engaging book that teaches you how to make arguments in various contexts and genres. The book has many strengths, such as: - It uses clear and accessible language, an attractive visual design, numerous examples, and fresh and timely readings to engage your interest. - It covers the whole process of argumentation, from finding a topic, to conducting research, to drafting, revising, and editing your essay. - It teaches you how to analyze arguments using Toulmin's model and rhetorical appeals (ethos, pathos, logos). - It shows you how to use style and tone effectively in arguments, as well as how to use visual elements and multimedia to enhance your arguments. - It provides you with a rich selection of readings on contemporary issues that reflect diverse perspectives and genres of argumentation. The book has some weaknesses, such as: - It does not cover some other models or types of argumentation, such as Rogerian or classical argumentation. - It does not provide enough guidance or examples on how to write different types of arguments, such as causal or definition arguments. - It does not include enough exercises or activities to help you practice or apply what you learn. Overall, Good Reasons with Contemporary Arguments is a valuable resource for anyone who wants to improve their argumentation skills. The book can help you write better essays for your classes, persuade your audience with good reasons, and participate in civic discourse on important issues. ## FAQs Here are some frequently asked questions about this book: - Q: Where can I buy this book? - A: You can buy this book from various online retailers, such as Amazon or Barnes & Noble. You can also buy this book from your campus bookstore or library. - Q: How can I access additional resources for this book? - A: You can access additional resources for this book from the publisher's website. The website includes quizzes, videos, links, and other materials that can help you learn more from this book. - Q: What are some other books that complement this book? - A: Some other books that complement this book are: - Everything's an Argument by Andrea Lunsford, John Ruszkiewicz, and Keith Walters. This book is another popular textbook on argumentation that covers similar topics and skills as Good Reasons with Contemporary Arguments. - They Say / I Say by Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein. This book is a practical guide on how to write academic arguments using templates and transitions. - Thank You for Arguing by Jay Heinrichs. This book is a witty and entertaining introduction to the art of persuasion and rhetoric. - Q: How can I apply what I learned from this book to my own writing projects? - A: You can apply what you learned from this book to your own writing projects by following these steps: - Find a topic and develop a research question that interests you and your audience. - Conduct research and evaluate sources that support your position and address opposing views. - Organize and draft your essay using the classical model of introduction, thesis statement, body paragraphs, and conclusion. - Revise and edit your essay by focusing on the global and local issues of your argument. - Use style and tone effectively in your argument, as well as visual elements and multimedia if appropriate. - Document your sources and avoid plagiarism using MLA or APA style. - Q: How can I give feedback to the authors of this book? - A: You can give feedback to the authors of this book by contacting them through their email addresses or social media accounts. You can also write a review or a comment on the publisher's website or other online platforms.




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